Apr 25, 2024  
Beaufort County Community College 2023 - 2024 Catalog 
  
Beaufort County Community College 2023 - 2024 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Policies



Academic Advising

Students who have earned 16 or fewer credit hours, from Beaufort County Community College or by transfer, are advised by the Centralized Advising Center. Students who have earned more than 16 credit hours, from Beaufort County Community College or by transfer, are advised by advisors appointed by the Vice President of Academic Affairs in conjunction with the Dean of each academic division. Changes in advisor assignment may occur when an advisor leaves the College, a student changes their program of study, or upon written request to the Director of the Centralized Advising Center or an academic Dean. In the event of a student conduct issue, the Vice President of Student Services may recommend an advisor reassignment.

Academic Dishonesty

Students enrolled at Beaufort County Community College are expected at all times to uphold standards of integrity. Students are expected to perform honestly and to work in every way possible to eliminate academic dishonesty by any member of the institution.

Academic Dishonesty consists of any deliberate attempt to falsify, fabricate, or otherwise tamper with data, information, records, or any other material that is relevant to the student’s participation in any course, laboratory, or otherwise academic exercise or function. Attempts at academic dishonesty will be viewed as an attempt to defraud the College and may result in permanent expulsion.

Cheating is an attempt to deceive the instructor in the effort to evaluate fairly an academic exercise. Cheating includes copying another student’s homework, classwork, or required project (in part or in whole) and handing it in as one’s own work; giving, receiving, offering, and/or soliciting information on a quiz, test, or exam; or plagiarism.

Plagiarism is the copying of any published work such as books, magazines, audiovisual programs, electronic media, and films, or copying the theme or manuscript from another person, including another student, without proper attribution. It is plagiarism when one uses direct quotations without proper credit and when one uses the ideas of another without giving proper credit. When three or more consecutive significant words are borrowed, the borrowing should be recognized by the use of quotation marks and proper parenthetical and bibliographic notations.

If upon investigation the administrator or instructor determines that a student is guilty of cheating or plagiarism, the following penalties will apply:

  • The student will receive a penalty of no less than zero on the work.
  • The instructor will submit a written report of the incident using the Academic Dishonesty Report Form to the Vice President of Student Services.
  • The Vice President of Student Services will determine whether further disciplinary action is warranted.
  • All decisions may be appealed for review by the Student Appeals Committee.

Academic Forgiveness

A student who has not been enrolled in curriculum courses at the College for 60 consecutive months may request the registrar to reevaluate his or her academic record. Under this policy, the student may request that his or her previous grade(s) of “F” not be used in calculating the GPA.

Prior to the reevaluation:

  • the student must be readmitted to the College,
  • register for courses, and
  • complete at least 12 credit hours of course work with a minimum quality point average of 2.0.

At the request of the student, the registrar will reevaluate his or her cumulative quality point average as provided above. A reevaluation is provided only once for each student.

Grades that are included in academic forgiveness are not exempt from academic progress relating to Financial Aid and VA educational benefits. Grades will still show on the transcript.

Academic Probation Policy

The policy governing academic performance at Beaufort County Community College is intended to assist students in successfully completing a chosen program of study. Since a 2.0 grade point average is required for graduation in all programs, a student is expected to maintain this cumulative average to be considered in good academic standing.

A period of adjustment is sometimes necessary for entering students. In recognition of this adjustment period, the following scale will be used to determine satisfactory progress toward an acceptable academic standing:

Hours Attempted in Program Grade Point Average
0-12 1.00
13-24 1.50
25-36 1.75
37 and above 2.00

Any student who fails to achieve the necessary cumulative grade point average as prescribed above will be placed on academic probation for the following semester. Grade (quality) point calculations for probation are made at the end of each semester and each summer term. A student shall be placed on academic probation if the minimum academic requirements are not met.

At the conclusion of each semester, the Registrar’s office will determine the Academic Standing of curriculum students. Students determined to be on Academic Probation in accordance with the Academic Probation Policy will be invited to have a conference with a counselor, with the exception of Career and College Promise (CCP) students, who will be referred to their respective CCP liaison for advising. During the drop-add period of the semester the student will meet with his/her faculty advisor and/or counselor to review the student’s program of study. The counselor may recommend a reduced course load, remedial work, or solutions to address the academic deficiency. Additionally, the counseling department will request a meeting with the student to discuss strategies and make recommendations for improved academic performance.

Students who fail to raise their cumulative grade point average to the prescribed average at the end of the semester of academic probation may be asked to register as a part-time student, and/or change to an alternate curriculum.

Some curricula and students receiving financial aid require academic standards in addition to the BCCC Academic Probation Policy. The standards are published and distributed to students upon entry into that curriculum. It is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with written policy.

Advanced Standing and Transfer Credit

All requests for transfer credit should be made before enrolling at Beaufort County Community College. Students desiring to have credits transferred from another postsecondary, regionally accredited institution to Beaufort County Community College must submit an official transcript to the Admissions Office. Transcripts from other postsecondary institutions should be submitted no later than six weeks into the term in which they are enrolled. Only courses with a grade of C or higher, or courses with grades of passing (P) implemented through a Pass/Fail option during an emergency situation, will be considered for transfer credit and must be equivalent in content and credit hours to the course(s) within the curriculum that the student is entering. Transcripts from regionally accredited institutions will be reviewed by the Registrar’s Office and evaluated for possible transfer credit. In some cases, students may be required to submit course descriptions. Any transfer student who possesses an Associate in Science or an Associate in Arts or baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university will have satisfied the general education and student success/orientation requirements for all programs of study and will have satisfied developmental education pre-requisites for all courses requiring such prerequisites. Transfer credit for specific majors is accepted to the extent that acceptance of the credits would not conflict with discipline-specific requirements from accrediting agencies, licensure bodies, or competitive admission programs. The decisions as to whether any transfer credit will be allowed, and if so, how much transfer credit will be allowed, and how such transfer credit will be applied, are discretionary on the part of the College. In general, courses will be considered for transferability regardless of their age; however, with approval from the Vice President of Academic Affairs, some programs may restrict the age of courses used for program admission, prerequisite purposes and/or program completion.

Attendance Policy

Beaufort County Community College adheres to the philosophy that regular attendance and/or participation in courses is essential to receiving maximum benefit from the educational experience. Beaufort County Community College requires that attendance be taken for all meeting dates of courses.

Audit Credit

Persons wishing to attend classes without earning credit may do so by registering as an audit student. The normal application and registration procedures must be followed. The level of an auditor’s participation in a class will be determined by the instructor and student at the beginning of the semester. Students auditing courses will be charged according to the published tuition rates.

Catalog of Record

A student with an active student status may graduate under the provisions of the catalog in effect on the date of entry or choose the requirements of a subsequently revised issue. A student who is not in continuous attendance must graduate under the provisions of the catalog in effect on the last re-entry date, or a subsequent issue. Students who change their program of study will be under the catalog of record at the time of the change.

Change in Program of Study

Students who wish to change their program of study must complete appropriate forms from the Admissions Office. These changes will be effective the following semester. The dean of the receiving division has the prerogative to stipulate conditions for approving change. These stipulations will be communicated to the student and Vice President of Student Services. Students are allowed to change their Program of Study two times in one academic year. If a student wants to change their program of study more than two times in the same academic year, they will be referred to the director of counseling for educational and/or career counseling. No student may enroll in more than two majors at the same time.

Computation of Grade Point Average (GPA)

The letter grade in each curriculum or developmental course will be converted to a quality point equivalent. The quality points are then multiplied by the semester credit hours. The total quality points are then divided by the total hours to give the grade point average.

Example:

Class Grade Quality Points   Credit Quality Points
ENG 111   A 4.0 X 3 12
BIO 163   B 3.0 X 5 15
PSY 150   C 2.0 X 3 6
        Total 11 33
        Divide 33/11 = 3.00 (GPA)  

The following table assigns quality points to specific letter grades. Letter grades not associated with quality points do not count towards calculation of GPA.

Letter Grade Points
A 4
B 3
C 2
D 1
F 0
AU*  
CE*  
I  
P  
R  
W*  
NA*  
TR*  
XT*  
NC*  

*Only assignable by the Registrar’s Office.

Continuing Education courses are not included in calculations of Grade Point Average.

Course Substitution

Students may substitute comparable higher-level general education courses in A.A.S. degree programs if the faculty advisor and placement tests indicate success potential. Students desiring to substitute higher-level general education A.A.S. courses should inform their advisor at the time of registration.

Substitution of one course for another may be considered when the action is in the best interest of the student and the substitution supports the educational goals and objectives of the student. Course substitutions must be approved by the lead instructor, Dean, and Vice President of Academics.

Credit for Prior Learning

Where appropriate, the College grants credit for knowledge and skills acquired outside the classroom as outlined in the College’s CPL handbook.

Credit by Examination

Under certain conditions, a student may be awarded credit by taking a series of departmental proficiency examinations and/or standardized tests in a particular subject area. Applications for credit by examination should be completed at least two weeks prior to the test administration. A student is eligible to take only one examination per course. A student seeking credit by examination must follow this procedure:

  1. Make application for Credit by Examination, giving evidence of adequate preparation for the examination. (Use Request for Special Examination form.)
  2. Obtain approval of instructor and dean.
  3. Register and pay fees for the course.
  4. Take the examination by the census date for the course consistent with 1D SBCC 800.8. If the student successfully passes the course, the course number, the number of credit hours, and the grade CE (credit by examination) will be entered on the student’s record. Tuition paid for a challenged course is nonrefundable. A student who has registered for a course (including for audit) and has been a member of the class beyond the census date of the course will no longer be eligible for credit by examination for that course.

Military Credit

The College grants credit where applicable for military service schools in accordance with the recommendations of the American Council on Education’s Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services and the College’s Credit for Prior Learning (CPL) handbook. Recommended credit must be consistent with the requirements and objectives of a curriculum in order to be granted. Students wishing to have military school records evaluated for credit should contact the Admissions Office to determine the appropriate military document required. Upon receipt of the required document, Admissions will forward the information to the Registrar’s Office. Questions concerning credit for military schools should be directed to the Registrar’s Office. Any student who has completed Basic Training may present certification by DD 214 or DD 295 and receive credit for HEA 110 - Personal Health/Wellness  and PED 111 - Physical Fitness I . Certification must be presented to the registrar’s office.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Credit

CLEP is a program that offers the student the opportunity to earn college credit for knowledge acquired outside the conventional classroom. College-level competency may have been acquired through personal reading, formal study, job experience, non- credit course work, television-taped courses, correspondence courses, military training, adult courses, and advanced studies in high school. See the College’s CPL handbook for more CLEP information.

Advanced Placement (AP) Credit

The College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) sponsors an advanced placement program that enables high school students to complete college-level courses while still in high school, to demonstrate college-level achievement through examinations, and to receive college course credit when they matriculate to an institution of higher education. The CEEB examinations are offered in high schools by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). Questions concerning score requirements and credit should be directed to the Registrar and the College’s CPL handbook.

Tech Prep Advanced Placement

Graduates of school systems which have current Tech Prep Articulation agreements with Beaufort County Community College are eligible to apply for advanced placement upon the recommendations of their high school instructors. To receive articulation credit, students must enroll at the community college within two years of their high school graduation date and meet the following criteria:

  1. Final grade of B of higher in the high school course.
  2. Score of 93 or higher in the standardized CTE post-assessment.

Details concerning specific requirements are available from high school counselors, the Registrar’s Office, and the College’s CPL handbook.

Credit Hour Load Policy

Students registering for more than 21 credit hours (more than 16 credit hours for summer term) must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher and the permission of their advisor and the Vice President of Academic Affairs.

Developmental Education

Prerequisite Procedures

Beaufort County Community College adheres to the prerequisite/corequisite requirements of the North Carolina Community College System’s Combined Course Library (CCL). The college also requires students to meet any locally added prerequisite/corequisite requirements. Exceptions to these requirements may be allowed in the following circumstances:

Developmental prerequisites for curriculum level courses may be waived if:

  1. A student receives transfer credit for appropriate developmental course work.
  2. A student receives transfer credit for ENG 111  and or the first required curriculum mathematics course.
  3. A student provides documentation of SAT scores that meet minimum requirements (See Admissions).
  4. A student provides documentation of ACT scores that meet minimum requirements (See Admissions).
  5. A student holds a bachelor’s degree or higher from a regionally accredited institution in which English was the language of instruction.

Note: Reference also should be made to the Credit for Prior Learning Student Handbook, which will assist students by introducing the various methods available at BCCC for obtaining credit for college-level work obtained outside the traditional classroom experience.

Placement Testing

If a student has not successfully completed a college-level math and/or English course, he/she may opt to take the RISE Placement Test. To be eligible to take the RISE Placement test, the student must have an admissions application on file. Students have a lifetime maximum of two attempts on each part of the RISE placement test. Testing attempts must be at least two weeks (14 days) apart. Most students with an unweighted high school grade point average less than a 2.2 will be required to take the placement test.

Drop/Add/Withdrawal

Courses may be added and dropped only during the period designated in the College calendar. To add or drop a course, students must submit a completed Drop/Add form to the Registrar’s office. To withdraw from a course, students must submit a completed Withdrawal form to the Registrar’s office.  Students who withdraw from a class after the census date and prior to the withdrawal deadline receive a grade of W and are not be eligible for a refund. Students who do not complete a class and do not officially withdraw receive the grade they earn for the class. Students are responsible for initiating the withdrawal process. Students who register early for classes requiring pre-requisites must drop those classes if they do not meet the pre-requisites (i.e., students must pass BIO168 to remain in BIO169).

To add or drop a course:

The student must:

  1. Complete all required information on the drop-add  form.
  2.  Students must obtain a signature from the financial aid office. Students may stop by the financial aid office or email the completed form to finaid@beaufortccc.edu to request a signature.
  3. Return the completed Drop/Add form to the Registrar’s Office or email to registrar@beaufortccc.edu for final processing.

To withdraw from course(s) after the drop/add period:

1. Student initiated withdrawal:

The student must:

  • Complete all required information on the Withdrawal form.
  • Obtain the instructor signature and the last date of attendance. If the instructor is not available, the student may email the instructor from their BCCC email to request the last date of attendance (LDA).  Once the instructor provides the LDA, the student must forward the email with the LDA to registrar@beaufortccc.edu.
  •  Students must obtain a signature from the financial aid office. Students may stop by the financial aid office or email the completed form to finaid@beaufortccc.edu to request a signature.
  •  Return the completed Withdrawal form to the Registrar’s Office or email to registrar@beaufortccc.edu for final processing.

 

2. Instructor initiated administrative withdrawal:

The instructor must:

  • Record the last date of attendance (LDA) in Self Service and remove any attendance for the student taken after the LDA. 

 

To withdraw from school:

The student must:

  1. Complete all required information on the Withdrawal form.
  2. Obtain the instructor(s) signature and the last date of attendance. If the instructor is not available, the student may email the instructor from their BCCC email to request the last date of attendance (LDA). Once the instructor provides the LDA, the student must forward the email with the LDA to registrar@beaufortccc.edu.
  3. Students must obtain a signature from the financial aid office. Students may stop by the financial aid office or email the completed form to finaid@beaufortccc.edu to request a signature.
  4. Return the completed Withdrawal form to the Registrar’s Office or email to registrar@beaufortccc.edu for final processing. for final processing.
  5. Settle outstanding debt (i.e., tuition, bookstore, library, parking, laptops, calculators, etc.)

*The Registrar’s Office will notify all instructors as necessary when a student drops a course or withdraws from a course.

*A student may not drop a class after the published last day to drop without academic penalty for reasons other than those of documented medical or another emergency.

Withdrawal Policy

Beaufort County Community College adheres to State Board Code 1E SBCCC 900.1(a)(4) that a student can officially be withdrawn by student, faculty, or staff from a course for the following reasons:

  1. The student notifies the Registrar’s Office of their intent to disenroll by completing the Withdrawal form and submitting it to the Registrar’s Office within the appropriate time.
  2. If a course is cancelled.
  3. If a student fails to meet the financial obligation required to remain in the class in good standing at the census date.
  4. An instructor initiates an administrative withdrawal as set forth in the Last Date of Attendance Recording Procedure for Instructors.
  5. Withdrawal of a student for reasons other than attendance (i.e. discipline, lack of academic performance, etc.) may be completed by recording the last date of attendance in Self Service signifying the student’s last date of enrollment and immediately contacting the Vice President of Student Services.
  6. The college reserves the right to grant a medical withdrawal to any student who presents appropriate documentation validating a severe medical condition that prohibited the student from successfully completing their course(s). The college reserves the right to provide financial assistance from local or foundation funds, pending availability, to hold the student financially harmless.

​Grading System

Curriculum

Final course grades will be issued at the end of each course. Grading the performance of students in course work is the responsibility of individual faculty members or instructor of record. Specific grading procedures, including a numerical scale, will be stated in each course syllabus. Deans are responsible for ensuring that grading policies are consistent within each division.

A Excellent
B Very Good
C Satisfactory
D Poor
F Failing
AU* Audit
CE* Credit By Examination
I Incomplete
P Pass
R Re-enroll
W* Withdrawal
NA* Never Attended
TR* Transfer Credit from NCCCS
XT* Transfer Credit outside NCCCS
NC* Non-course Credit

*Only assignable by the Curriculum Registrar’s Office. Incompletes are assigned when a student fails to complete the work for a course due to unavoidable reasons. An incomplete which is not removed by the end of the next semester becomes an F. The R grade is used only for developmental classes.

Co-requisite curriculum English and Math courses offered under RISE are graded using letter grades of P and F.

Grades earned in continuing education courses are not included in GPA calculations.

Graduation Requirements

Students must apply for graduation one semester prior to the semester in which they expect to complete their work. The application must be made through the Registrar’s Office. To be eligible for graduation, a student must complete all prescribed courses for the curriculum. Students must have a minimum program grade point average (GPA) of 2.00. Grade point averages are calculated by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of credit hours attempted. Courses used in this calculation are those completed at Beaufort County Community College that are listed in the student’s curriculum outline as minimum requirements and additional courses/substitutions approved by the appropriate lead instructor, Dean, and Vice President of Academic Affairs. Students must complete a minimum of 25 percent of the hours required for a degree, diploma, or certificate in residence at Beaufort County Community College. To graduate, each student must fulfill all financial obligations to the College, including graduation fees. Graduation fees must be paid prior to graduation.

Licensing of Graduates

Beaufort County Community College is an educational institution and assumes no responsibility for the licensing of its graduates. Students convicted of a felony or any other crimes involving moral turpitude may not be recognized by the proper licensing agency.

Religious Observance

Beaufort County Community College shall authorize two excused absences each academic year for religious observances required by the faith of a student, faculty, or staff. BCCC requires that the student provide written notice of the request for an excused absence a minimum of one week prior to the religious observance absence. The student shall work with the instructor and be given the opportunity to make up any tests or other work missed due to an excused absence for a religious observance.

Repeating Coursework

A student who has previously passed a curriculum course with a grade of D or better may repeat that course once within five years. Additional repeats of courses must be approved by the appropriate chairperson and the Vice President of Academic Affairs. No course may be counted more than once in determining the total number of semester hour credit for graduation. In all cases of repeated courses, the highest grade achieved will be the grade of record. Any required course in which an F is received must be repeated and passed before the student can graduate.

Teach-Out Plans and Agreements 

  1. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC)

As required by our accreditor, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC), if the institution decides to close an educational program, site, branch campus, or the entire institution, it must consider the following options: 

  • The institution teaches out currently enrolled students; no longer admits students to programs; and terminates the program, the operations of a site or a branch campus, or the operations of an institution after students have graduated. The institution must submit to the Commission a teach-out plan for approval. 
  • If the institution enters into a contractual teach-out agreement for another institution to teach out the educational programs or program, the teach-out agreement requires Commission approval in advance.

A teach out-plan is a written plan developed by an institution that provides for the equitable treatment of students if an institution, or an institutional location that provides 50 percent of at least one program, ceases to operate before all students have completed their program of study, and may include a teach-out agreement between institutions. In such cases and in accord with Federal regulation 602.24 (c), the institution is required to submit the teach-out plan to the office of the Commission on Colleges for approval prior to its implementation. The institution may include a teach-out agreement as part of its teach-out plan. A teach-out agreement is a written agreement between institutions that provides for the equitable treatment of students and a reasonable opportunity for students to complete their program of study if an institution, or an institutional location that provides 50 percent of at least one program offered, ceases to operate before all enrolled students have completed their program of study. If an institution includes a teach-out agreement as part of its teach-out plan, the agreement should be submitted to the Commission office for approval prior to its implementation.

  1. National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Labatory Sciences (NAACLS)

A general plan must be provided to NAACLS, addressing temporary and permanent program closure. In the event of such closure, a detailed plan must be submitted to NAACLS within 30 days of the official announcement.

  1. North Carolina Board of Nursing (NCBON)

Process for program closure:  (a) When the controlling institution makes the decision to close a nursing program, the Administration of the institution shall submit a written plan for the discontinuation of the program to the Board and shall include the reasons for program closure, the date of intended closure, and a plan for students to complete this or another approved program. (b) When the Board closes a nursing program, the program director shall, within 30 days, develop and submit a plan for discontinuation of the program for Board approval. The plan shall address transfer of students to approved programs. (c) The controlling institution shall notify the Board of the arrangement for secure storage and access to academic records and transcripts.

Transfer and Course Credit

Comprehensive Articulation Agreement

The North Carolina Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) is a statewide agreement governing the transfer of credits between NC community colleges and NC public universities and has as its objective the smooth transfer of students. The CAA provides certain assurances to the transferring student; for example:

Assures admission to one of the 16 UNC institutions (Transfer Assured Admissions Policy).

Enables NC community college graduates of two-year Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degree programs who are admitted to constituent institutions of the university of NC to transfer with junior status.

Transfer Credit Appeal Procedure

If a student from a North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) college believes the terms of the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) have not been honored by a University of North Carolina System (UNC) institution to which the student has been admitted, the student may invoke the CAA Transfer Credit Appeal Procedure.

Transfer of Associate in Arts and Associate in Science Degree Programs

  1. The CAA enables North Carolina community college graduates of two-year Associate in Arts (AA) and Associate in Science (AS) degree programs who are admitted to constituent institutions of The University of North Carolina System to transfer with junior status.
  2. Requirements for admission to some major programs may necessitate additional courses not available at the community college. Time to baccalaureate degree may be impacted for students entering such programs, and students should plan accordingly.
  3. Universities cannot place requirements on students transferring under the CAA that are not required of their native students.
  4. A student who completes the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree prior to transfer to a UNC institution will have fulfilled the UNC institution’s lower division general education requirements.
  5. Each UNC campus will establish and publish a campus policy/guideline outlining the campus decision on whether a student who receives an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree through reverse transfer will have fulfilled the UNC institution’s lower-division general education requirements.
  6. Due to degree requirements in some majors, additional courses at the UNC institution may be required beyond the general education courses and pre-major courses taken at the community college. 
  7. Community college graduates of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree programs who have earned 60 semester hours in approved transfer courses with a grade of “C” or better and an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale will receive at least 60 semester hours of academic credit upon admission to a UNC institution.
  8. All courses approved for transfer in the CAA are designated as fulfilling general education or pre-major/elective requirements. While general education and pre-major courses may also be used as electives, elective courses may not be used to fulfill general education requirements.
  9. CAA courses taken beyond the 60-61 SHC of credit in which the student received less than a “C” will not negate the provisions of the CAA.

Students Not Completing the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science Degrees

A North Carolina community college student who satisfactorily completes, with a grade of “C” or better, courses identified in the Universal General Education Transfer Component will receive credit applied toward the university’s lower-division general education course requirements, subject to the following distribution limit: maximum of 6 hours in English Composition, 9 hours in Humanities/Fine Arts/Communications, 9 hours in Social/Behavioral Sciences, 8 hours in Mathematics, and 8 hours in the Natural Sciences.

A North Carolina community college student who satisfactorily completes a transfer course that is not designated as a Universal General Education Transfer Component course will receive transfer credit for the course. The receiving institution will determine whether the course will count as general education, pre-major, or elective credit

Certification of Universal General Education Transfer Component Courses, Associate in Arts Degree, or Associate in Science Degree Completion

Certification of completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree is the responsibility of the community college at which the courses are successfully completed. Transcript identification of Universal General Education Transfer Component courses is also the responsibility of the community college at which the courses are completed. The transcripts of students who transfer before completing the degree will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the receiving university. The transferring student who has not completed the degree must meet the receiving institution’s general education requirements.

Baccalaureate Degree Plan (BDP) Four-Year Degree Plan for Community College Transfer Students

Beyond the Universal General Education Transfer Component courses, a program of study leading to the associate degree contains courses related to a student’s major or program emphasis. Pre-major course tracks prepare students to succeed in their chosen field and provide students with clear pathways to completion. Each UNC institution will develop, publish, and maintain Baccalaureate Degree Plans (BDPs) identifying community college courses that provide pathways leading to associate degree completion, admission into the major, and baccalaureate completion. Students who complete the AA or AS degree and the degree plan tracks published by a UNC institution, and who are accepted into that institution and into that major within four years of initial enrollment at the community college, will continue into that major at the UNC institution with all courses fulfilling lower-division general education and other degree requirements.

Other Associate Degree Programs

Students completing courses designated Universal General Education Transfer Component will receive equivalent general education course credit for those courses at the receiving institution. For courses not designated as Universal General Education Transfer Component, the receiving institution will determine whether the course will count as general education or pre-major/elective credit.

Associate in Applied Science degree programs may be handled on a bilateral articulation agreement basis rather than on a state-wide basis. Under bilateral agreements, individual universities and one or more community colleges may join in a collaborative effort to facilitate the transfer of students from AAS degree programs to baccalaureate degree programs.

The Transfer Advisory Committee (TAC) encourages the development of new bilateral articulation agreements among institutions; however, TAC will not maintain a current inventory of bilateral articulation agreements for AAS degree programs.

Transfer of Advanced Placement (AP) Course Credit

Advanced Placement (AP) course credits, awarded for a score of three or higher, are acceptable as part of a student’s successfully completed Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree under the CAA. Students who receive AP course credit at a community college but do not complete the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree will have AP credit awarded on the basis of the receiving institution’s AP policy. Please visit the registrar’s office for a complete listing of approved AP credit.